Sarah Jane Luper

Sarah Jane Luper

Female 1843 - 1927  (84 years)

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  • Name Sarah Jane Luper 
    Born 29 Mar 1843  Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Female 
    Census 1 Jun 1850  Mcdonough Co., Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Age: 7y 
    Arrival 28 Aug 1853  Oregon City, Clackamas County, Oregon, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Oregon trail, Plains Crossing 
    Census 24 Aug 1860  Albany, Linn, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Age: 17y 
    Address:
    Albany 
    Census 1 Jun 1870  Coast Fork, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Age: 27y 
    Occupation 1 Jun 1870  Coast Fork, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Keeping House 
    Census 21 Jun 1880  Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Age: 37y 
    Occupation 21 Jun 1880  Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Keeping House 
    Census 1 Jun 1900  Mapleton, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Age: 57y 
    Occupation 1 Jun 1900  Mapleton, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Keeping House 
    Census 15 Apr 1910  Mapleton, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Age: 67y 
    Address:
    Smith River Road 
    Occupation 15 Apr 1910  Mapleton, Lane, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    None 
    Anecdote 15 Dec 1914  Glenada, Lane Co., Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    • Memories of the Plains Crossing, See p. 9-11 of citation
    Died Nov 1927 
    • Notes from Mollie Luper
    Notes 
    • REMINISCENCES OF TRIP ACROSS THE PLAIN
      By JANE LUPER DOUGLAS
      Now, as Uncle John Luper has crossed the Plains, I will see what I can think of, or see if I can freshen up my memory of those childhood days out on the Plains where we saw Indians, Buffalo, Rocky Mountain Sheep, Sage Hens and Rabbits.
      It was in the Spring of 1853 that I remember well of leaving the old Home place in McDonough County, Illinois, for Oregon.
      My father had three large wagons loaded with provision and clothing besides a large spring wagon that Ma and us children rode in. This wagon was drawn by a span of large mares, and the large-loaded wagons were drawn by oxen. We had several cows that were broke to yoke and hitched to the wagons the same as the oxen, but I don't remember of seeing the cows put into the teams with the oxen.
      After bidding all the friends and relatives good-bye, we drove up to Uncle Issac Butler's to stay that night. And after supper there, we went over to my Grandfather Robinson's and there ate another supper, though my supper there consisted mostly of biscuit and honey and I don't think that I have ever tasted honey that was half so good, and that too with big fat cream biscuit. My, I can almost taste them yet.
      Well, after bidding those relatives good-bye in the morning, we started on, and it seemed to me only 2 or 3 days till we reached the Mississippi River that we crossed at Burlington. There we stopped for awhile. I remember that Ma went into the store and done some shopping. And I sat there in the wagon and watched the fashionably dressed women. It seemed to me that I never saw so many pretty women. I am surprised now that our men didn't all stop there - according to my childish fancy they were something grand.
      Then on and on we traveled, through the state of Iowa through storm and mud. When almost across that State, we saw the first Indians

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      out in their war paint, great tall, strapping big fellows that made us children crawl back into the wagons and cover up our heads.
      The Indians came out to meet the emigrants, holding out their hands, begging for money. Before we reached the Missouri River, we stopped at Council Bluff to load in provisions that had been shipped on ahead from some point near our old home, I think Canton. After Pa and the men had loaded in their freight, we drove on and I believe crossed the Missouri River that afternoon, late. There on the steamer that crossed us over, I saw the first Negro that I ever saw. And that scared me almost cold, for as he pulled our hack on deck, I thought he was going to pull us into the river. But we were all cold that night for we had to crawl off to bed with just crackers and hardtack for our supper. I remember of complaining over that night's lodging too. The river was rising fast and the men had to get some teams together and haul the wagons up out of the river bottom into the woods that was higher land; and there tied their teams to the trees ill morning. There is the spot where Omaha now stand. Then, after driving out into the open prairie, a pretty spot I thought, they made a fire and cooked eur breakfast. I don't remember anything of importance for a long distance, only the long tedious journey. It was travel all day. Stop and camp. Cook and eat - the next day the same thing over. And so on to the end.
      I can look back now and see so many little things that are only "memories" now.
      And I don't wonder that the men got too lazy to wash their faces when we struck camp-even refused to wash before they ate. I remember one evening that Pa told them there was no supper for them unless they washed and cleaned up a little. And just think of the dust and heat. But we were all there and had to keep moving if it was tiresome, and so it was. I remember of crossing Green River, a rough, rocky stream but the water so low that we forded. And after crossing safely, I got the worse scare that I encountered on the whole trip with an old Indian.
      I was riding in Uncle John's wagon and an Indian came sneaking up along beside the wagon as we were waiting for other teams to come on;
      and the off ox, Old Buck that would not let any of us children come near him was so very kind that he let that old Indian come forward between him and the wheel to look in and see what was inside of that wagon. Of course he saw a rifle strapped on each side of the wagon bows. Well, maybe I did not let out a yell loud enough to raise the dead on those plains, and I gave Uncle John a scolding besides. To this day I have no love for an Indian nor do I like to read Indian stories
      Well do I remember old Fort Laramie where Pa came near turning one of his men away for taking something that did not belong to him. I wrote my name on that Independence Rock that Uncle John mentions in his diary, and I tried to do what I saw others do, except to plunge into some stream and try to swim.

      99

      I also remember a big snow storm on Bear River on the 4th of July. I also remember Hot Springs and crossing a small stream where the water was hot enough to wash clothes. One spring they called Humboldt that was huge like a great boiling kettle. On Platte River I saw a herd of buffalo plunge into the river and swim across to the other side. We heard thunder storms in that country that were hard to beat. So along in that country it was thunder storms and Indians. One time as soon as our cattle were turned loose, they swam across a stream and into the woods' they went, seemingly on an Island I know. I rode there day after day, reading the Guide Books to see where would be our next camping places; those books which tell the names of streams and mention the camping places and if there was grass or not. Pa made it his business to walk on ahead towards evening to hunt up a camping place where there was water and grass - and wood if to be had.
      Well, finally we drifted on over the Cascade Mountains into Oregon, or better yet, into the Willamette Valley and on into Linn County where Pa bought out Avery Smith's Donation Claim, paid him $500.00 in gold - yes, in 50 dollar "gold slugs" that I never forget. There we were in a house again and how glad to have an earthen plate to eat on once more. Now you know all the rest. So, good-by till we reach the other country.
      Sarah Jane Luper Douglas

      Source Foulkes, Allied Families, 1952.
    Person ID I534  Bratt Family Tree
    Last Modified 30 Jun 2021 

    Father James Martin Bernheisel Luper,   b. 26 Dec 1817, Harmonsburg, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 1903, San Diego, San Diego County, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Mother Margaret Robinson,   b. 19 Nov 1821,   d. 11 Apr 1844, Fulton, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years) 
    Married 24 Oct 1841 
    Family ID F118  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family James Sanders Douglas,   b. Apr 1833, Switzerland Co., Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Oct 1925, Marion County, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Married 13 Jul 1860 
    Children 
    +1. Lillian Antoinette Douglas,   b. 22 Sep 1862, Centralia, Washington Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Sep 1921, Eugene, Lane County, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     2. Lincoln Douglas,   b. 1864
    +3. Arthur Douglas,   b. Jun 1866, Oregon, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1936  (Age 70 years)
     4. Oradell Douglas,   b. Cal 1872, Oregon, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Nina E Douglas,   b. Apr 1891, California Find all individuals with events at this location  [Adopted]
    Last Modified 14 Jun 2016 
    Family ID F275  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 29 Mar 1843 - Illinois Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsArrival - Oregon trail, Plains Crossing - 28 Aug 1853 - Oregon City, Clackamas County, Oregon, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Age: 17y,Address:
    Albany - 24 Aug 1860 - Albany, Linn, Oregon
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Age: 37y - 21 Jun 1880 - Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Keeping House - 21 Jun 1880 - Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Luper, Jane, Hattie, and Jenny
    Luper, Jane, Hattie, and Jenny
    Luper Sisters - Portrait
    Luper Sisters - Portrait
    Caption Note: From M. Spangler
    Keywords: Picture

  • Sources 
    1. [S298] Luper, James Martin Bernheisel, 1850, Census, USA, McDonough, Illinois, USA, (Year: 1850; Census Place: McDonough, Illinois; Roll: M432_116; Page: 315B; Image: 480).

    2. [S530] Luper, John - Oregon Trail Log (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S299] Luper, James Martin Bernheisel, 1860, Census, USA, Albany, Linn, Oregon, (Year: 1860; Census Place: Linn, Oregon; Roll: M653_1055; Page: 352; Image: 708; Family History Library Film: 805055).

    4. [S320] Douglas, James S., 1870, Census, USA, Coast Fork, Lane, Oregon, (Year: 1870; Census Place: Coast Fork, Lane, Oregon; Roll: M593_1286; Page: 513B; Image: 167098; Family History Library Film: 552785).

    5. [S321] Douglas, James S., 1880, Census, USA, Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon, (Year: 1880; Census Place: Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon; Roll: 1082; Family History Film: 1255082; Page: 288A; Enumeration District: 067; Image: 0017).

    6. [S322] Douglas, James S., 1900, Census, USA, Mapleton, Lane, Oregon, (Year: 1900; Census Place: Mapleton, Lane, Oregon; Roll: 1349; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0104; FHL microfilm: 1241348).

    7. [S323] Douglas, James S., 1910, Census, USA, Mapleton, Lane, Oregon, (Year: 1910; Census Place: Mapleton, Lane, Oregon; Roll: T624_1282; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0155; FHL microfilm: 1375295).